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Utagawa Kunitoshi (1847-1899)


Biographical Data

Biography

Source: The Hotei Encyclopedia of Japanese Woodblock Prints, Amy Reigle Newland, et. al., Hotei Publishing, 2005, Volume 2, p. 504
Utagawa Kunitoshi (1847-1899) 歌川国利

A pupil of Utagawa Kunisada I (1786–1865) and Utagawa Kunitsugu (1800–1861).  Following Kunisada’s death in 1865 he studied under Utagawa Kunisada II (1823-1880).  He produced Yokohama-e and kaika-e, depicting horse-drawn streetcars and the like, and meisho-e, illustrating Meiji-era Tokyo.  He also made etchings (e.g., Street of Tokyo: Horse-drawn Rail Carriages Crossing the Manseibashi Bridge (Tokyo shigai tetsudo basha Manseibashi tsuko no kei,1882) and View of the Ocean from Atagoyama (Atagoyama sanjo yori kaijo miharashi), from the set Famous Sights of Tokyo (Tokyo meisho, 1890.)

A Second Rate Artist?

Source: The Maintenance of Tradition in the Face of Contemporary Demands: A Reassessment of Meiji Prints, Oikawa Shigeru, article appearing in The Hotei Encyclopedia of Japanese Woodblock Prints, Amy Reigle Newland, et. al., Hotei Publishing, 2005, Volume 1, p. 262
As a consequence of the economies in print production that Meiji era publishers were trying to achieve "was the widespread practice of employing second-rate artists such as Utagawa Kunitoshi, Utagawa Kunihisa (act. c. 1800-20) and Utagawa Fusatane (act. c. late 1850s-70).  They could churn out slapdash, easy-to-produce designs, in contrast to masters like Utagawa Sadahide (1807-1873), Kawanabe Kyōsai (1831-1889), Yoshitoshi Tsukioka (1839-1892) and others whose compositions involved intricate line-work.


An Interesting Woodblock Print


Utagawa Kunitoshi, 1881
Mimochi on’na natsu no tawamure – Gotō juttai no zu
Pregnant women playing in summer heat - 5 heads with 10 bodies