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Nōgaku hyakuban, Kinsatsu

Nōgaku hyakuban, Mekari
 

Japanese Color Woodblock Print

Kinsatsu 金札

(The Golden Tablet)

No. 42 from the series Nōgaku hyakuban

by Tsukioka Kōgyo, 1923

Nōgaku hyakuban, Tomonaga


IHL Cat. #2215

About This Print

One of 120 prints issued as part of the series Nōgaku hyakuban (One Hundred Prints of Noh). The print depicts the god Amatsu Futodama carrying a bow and arrow with which to subdue demons and ensure the peace of the land.

The pyre in the background "suggests that this is an outdoor performance called takigi nō. The custom has its origins in the practice of burning sacred firewood (takigi), a special ceremony held at the Kofuku Temple (Kōfukuji), one of the most ancient Buddhist temples in Nara."1

This print was originally released by the publisher Matsuki Heikichi in the fourteenth installment of prints in this series.  This series' prints were offered in monthly installments consisting of three prints packaged in an envelope with additional descriptive information.2  

For other depictions of this play by the artist see Nōga taikan, Kinsatsu.

Variant Printing
It is unknown how many times the prints in this series were re-printed, but variations (usually use of different colors on parts of the actor's costume) between prints of the same play suggest there were at least two separate printings. It may be as suggested by Claus-Peter Schulz in his October, 2000 article appearing in Andon 67, that "there might have also been a later second issue" of these prints by the publisher that were assembled by the publisher for sale at the completion of the series.

click on image to enlarge

The Beauty of Silence: Nō and Nature Prints by Tsukioka Kōgyo (1869-1927), Robert Schaap & J. Thomas Rimer, Hotei Publishing, 2010, p. 93.
“The series Nogaku hyakuban (100 No plays) by Tsukioka Kogyo (1869-1927),” Claus-Peter Schulz, Andon 67, Society for Japanese Arts, p. 28.


The Play - Kinsatsu

Source: A Guide to No, P.G. O'Neill, Hinoki Shoten, 1929, p. 77-78.

By Zeami
Third group
All schools


Characters
Act 1: waki -  an Imperial envoy; waki-tsure - two retainers; shite - an old man; kyōgen - a local person
Act 2: nochi-shite -  the god Amatsu Futodama

An Imperial envoy goes to the village of Fushimi in Yamashiro Province in connection with a new shrine being built there by the Emperor Kammu.  While talking with an old man whom he meets there, a tablet with gold writing on it falls from the sky.  Taking it up, the envoy read that the god to whom it belongs promises constant protection to the land.  The old man then takes the tablet and disappears, revealing as he does so that he is the god, Amatsu Futodama.  He then appears in his true form, carrying a bow and arrow with which to subdue demons and ensure the peace of the land.

Print Details

 IHL Catalog #2215
 Title Kinsatsu 金札 (The Golden Tablet)
 Series Nōgaku hyakuban 能楽百番 (One Hundred Prints of Noh or One Hundred Noh Plays)
 Artist 
 Tsukioka Kōgyo (1869-1927)
 Signature 
Kōgyo 耕漁
 Seal
Kōgyo 耕漁 seal (shown above), seal no. 49, p. 171 in The Beauty of Silence: Nō and Nature Prints by Tsukioka Kōgyo (1869-1927), Robert Schaap & J. Thomas Rimer, Hotei Publishing, 2010.
 Date August 1923
 Edition unknown
 Publisher
Matsuki Heikichi (Daikokuya)
松木平吉 (大黒屋)
seal reading:
東京両国 大黒屋 発行
published by Daikokuya, Tokyo, Ryōgoku 
 Carver 
 Impression excellent
 Colors excellent
 Condition excellent - album backing; slightly trimmed
 Genre ukiyo-e
 Miscellaneous  
 Format oban tate-e
 H x W Paper 14 7/8 x 10 1/16 in. (37.8 x 25.6 cm)
 Collections This Print Ritsumeikan University Art Research Center AcNo. arcUP1384Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, Scripps College 2007.1.73
 Reference Literature
 (pictured in)
 The Beauty of Silence: Nō and Nature Prints by Tsukioka Kōgyo (1869-1927), Robert Schaap & J. Thomas Rimer, Hotei Publishing, 2010, p. 93.
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